Resolution on Equality of Treatment In Israeli Hotels

Posted on: Monday May 21, 2012

Background

It has become increasingly the case that when Masorti/Conservative groups have wished to daven in Israeli hotels, they have been denied the use of hotel-owned Sifrei Torah if the service was not in accordance with Orthodox practice. In some cases the hotels have offered to locate a Sefer Torah from outside the hotel at an additional fee to the guests. In other cases it became necessary for guests to make arrangements on their own.

Resolution

Whereas Israel is the homeland for all Jewish People;

Whereas the Rabbinical Assembly is on record as encouraging both Aliyah and tourism to Israel;

Whereas the Rabbinical Assembly is committed to religious pluralism in Israel and the fair treatment of all streams of Judaism;

Whereas many hotels in Israel have refused to provide access to the use of Sifrei Torah to Masorti/Conservative groups and guests wishing to daven on Torah reading days, or have only permitted access when such groups and guests pay additional fees and Sifrei Torah are brought in from outside the hotel;

Whereas the Rabbinical Assembly consistently has called for religious pluralism in Israel.

Therefore be it resolved that the Rabbinical Assembly call upon the Israeli Hotel Association and all Israeli hotels to treat Jews of all denominations equally and to afford Jews and all groups of non-Orthodox streams any of the rights and privileges afforded Orthodox guests including the use of a synagogue and a Sefer Torah.

Be it further resolved that the Rabbinical Assembly call upon all Masorti/Conservative groups to patronize hotels that follow this policy

Be it further resolved that the Rabbinical Assembly will notify the Israel Ministry of Tourism, the Israeli Hotel Association and Israel tour group operators of this policy; and

Be it further resolved that the Rabbinical Assembly will encourage other arms of the Movement and other denominations to adopt a similar policy and shall work with them to effect change.

Passed by the Rabbinical Assembly Plenum, May, 2012